The Assumed Objective vs. the Real Objective of Exercise

The Assumed Objective vs. the Real Objective of Exercise
The ASSUMED primary objective of an exercise:
To perform as many repetitions as possible with as much weight as possible.
But this is actually the secondary objective.
The REAL primary objective of an exercise:
To momentarily weaken the musculature, to inroad it as safely, quickly,
efficiently, and deeply as possible for the purpose of stimulating the muscular
growth mechanism with the least amount of weight in the least amount
of time.
A common statement is made by trainees as they begin to encounter difficulty of
an exercise. They inappropriately complain:
“I can’t lift it.”
And my response is:
“Who cares? I’m not expecting or asking you to lift it. And your muscles don’t
know or care if you lift it. So why are you so concerned? It doesn’t matter if it
won’t move. Just keep trying. If you can do so in proper form, great! If you can’t,
great! Just keep trying, but do not break proper form or change the way you are
exerting effort. Your ability or inability to move the weight has no bearing on your
ability to apply force against it, no matter how slight your force output. And your
ability or inability to move the weight has no bearing on whether or not you are
stimulating a growth response.”
-Hutchins